Recent Storm Damage Posts

Storms Do Not Require a Name

2/11/2021 (Permalink)

Weather Conditions Affecting Buildings Weather Affects Buildings

How many ways are weather forecast broadcast? Weather forecasters have become celebrities appearing in the midst of real, and not so real, storms defying the odds of physical harm. Radio, newsprint, television, a plethora of online outlets, smartwatches, spouses, and spouses' parents are valued weather resources. 

My grandmother was before her time inventing the doppler radar concept in the early '70s. "Fortunately" we lived in an area where we centrally located between three television stations (when the antenna was aligned correctly) observing the weather forecast at varying times. By watching the weather reports back-to-back she formulated our local weather forecast. More recently forecasters present information days if not weeks in advance. Weather forecast for the East Coast often focus on hurricanes and projected rainfall, wind, and damaging effects. Bread, milk, and sugar fly off the grocery store shelves. Winter-time brings a forecast of snow, ice, and mixed precipitation. Anyone visiting or having recently moved to a southern region should be acutely aware Southerners drive very poorly during any wintertime-related weather inconsistencies, and during a hurricane are bound and determined to drive around before, during, and after the hurricane.  

Frequently weather events occurring in relatively small geographical areas are not broadcasted leaving property owners and property managers to observe weather conditions and resulting effects on buildings. 

A roof requiring maintenance or replacement before a storm may leak allowing water to affect the building's interior. Attic insulation, ceilings, walls, and personal contents may be affected. 

Low lying buildings may experience flooding into the building or when a crawlspace is present the crawlspace may flood. A crawlspace is an area below when the building floor is elevated above ground level. Crawlspaces may be utilized for HVAC ducting and HVAC, plumbing, and electrical components. Insulation placed beneath the floor is also in the crawlspace. the materials may be affected by rising water. 

Freezing temperatures may lead to burst plumbing and water damages. Remember to protect plumbing fixtures and plumbing to prevent damages. 

When a building is affected by severe weather SERVPRO of Fayetteville can assist to reduce additional damages and mitigate existing damages. 

Preparing for a Storm

2/1/2021 (Permalink)

Satellite photo of hurricane Be Prepared

Focus on these eight tasks to prevent potential damage to your home and automobiles (siding, windows, roof, cars.) 

1. Secure items in your yard, on your balcony and patio area to prevent items from being blown into your home. You may consider removing items for storage or securing. Examples may be outdoor furniture, trampolines or items unsecured. 

2. Clean gutters, down pipes and drains to prevent blockages and resulting water from entering home or flooding in the yard and beneath home. Do not park vehicles in low lying areas.

3. Trim trees and branches to prevent falling on home or vehicles during periods of high wind. In some cases tree removal may be required. Strong winds may uproot trees damaging vehicles or home. 

4. Repair any damage to roof prior to storm. Additional damage may occur during wind and rain allowing water to penetrate the roof. 

5. Review your insurance policy. If you do not understand any terms or know if your coverage addresses potential damage contact your insurance agent. 

6. Have an emergency plan. The plan should cover, at a minimum: what to do if all family members are not at home when the storm strikes, how to contact family members, where to meet if the home is damaged, who will be the point-of-contact (hub of communication.) Make sure everyone knows the plan. 

7. Maintain an emergency kit. Day-to-day supplies may not be accessible immediately following a storm. It is easy to forget what is needed until it is missing. The kit should be kept in a safe place and stored in a water proof container. Examples are, but not limited to: prescription information, insurance policy information, water, medications, first aid kit, batteries, important documents, flash light, non-perishable food, cash, battery operated radio for weather updates and cell phone. 

8. Determine a radio source for weather warnings focusing on your area. Be prepared for the storm by listening to weather updates. Once you know the frequency of updates check during these times. 

Note: Some tasks listed may require a professional. Do not attempt unless your are qualified to complete the task. Contact a professional in your area for your safety. 

Spring and Summer Storms can be Beautiful, but Dangerous

5/1/2020 (Permalink)

With the weather heating up in North Carolina its starting to feel like Summer, but this also brings increased chances of threatening storms. Spring and Summer storms can pose a risk for flooding, damaging winds, and possible hail.

Make sure to stay updated with your local weather station to make a plan for any disaster. Take extra precaution to prepare for flooding if you live in or near a flood zone or low lying area. In the event of strong winds, keep an eye on large trees that are close to your home.

Flooding and water emergencies don’t wait for regular business hours and neither do we. SERVPRO of Fayetteville provides emergency cleaning and restoration services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week—including all holidays. We hope everyone stays safe as these storms become more frequent, but we are always ready to help our community in an emergency situation.

Are You "Hurricane Ready"?

3/2/2020 (Permalink)

This time of year can always be scary for anyone who lives in the possible path of hurricanes or may have friends and family who do live in a consistent path. Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over ocean water and often move toward land. Hurricanes include high winds, heavy rainfall, storm surge, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents and tornadoes all of which can destroy homes, buildings, and roads. It is important to stay ready so you do not find yourself scrambling to brace for the impact. There is always the potential looming that our area could be hit by a hurricane. Living in the Birmingham, AL area, it can be easy to think you don’t need to worry about the potential of a hurricane. Here are a few things to know ahead of a hurricane if one was to head our direction. 

Know the Difference

  • Flood/Flash Flood Watch—Flooding or flash flooding is possible in your area.
  • Flood/Flash Flood Warning—Flooding or flash flooding is already occurring or will occur soon in your area. 

How to Prepare

  • Listen to area radio and television stations and a NOAA Weather Radio for possible flood warnings and reports of flooding in progress or other critical information from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • Be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice.
  • When a flood or flash flood warning is issued for your area, head for higher ground and stay there.
  • Because standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding, it’s important to have protection from the floods associated with hurricanes, tropical storms, heavy rains and other conditions that impact the U.S. For more information on flood insurance, please visit the National Flood Insurance Program Web site at www.FloodSmart.gov.

Always Know the RisksTo find your risk, visit FEMA’s “Know Your Risk Map.” Be better prepared for this hurricane season, and learn more at www.ready.gov/prepare

Are You Prepared for a Thunderstorm?

2/18/2020 (Permalink)

During this time of year we can experience a lot of rain, which can lead to thunderstorms. It’s important to be prepared and have a plan in place. Talk with your family and create an emergency plan for thunderstorms, floods, and tornadoes. Think about an emergency shelter and evacuation plan. Below we have a few suggestions to make sure you and your family are ready for whatever happens. 

Protect your electronics

Your electronics can get fried if they are not properly protected. Plug electronics into a surge protector to avoid damage during a storm. 

Prepare for power outages

Have battery-operated flashlights and lanterns in easy to get to places. Check on these items from time to time to make sure the batteries still work, replace them if necessary. Also, think about keeping the refrigerator and freezer doors shut to keep food from spoiling. If these food items rise above 40 degrees for 2 hours or more, they should be disregarded. Call your local power company to inform them of the outage and to get information regarding when the power should be restored. 

Stay away from power lines

Do not go near power lines should they fall to the ground, they can be very hazardous. Call 911 if you see downed power lines. 

Go inside when you hear thunder

If you hear thunder, it is likely that lightning is also occurring. Lightning can be dangerous, therefore, make sure to go inside when thunder occurs. 

Seek shelter

There are many different natural elements which can occur and be harmful when outside during a disaster. Therefore, during a storm, it is important to seek shelter and be safe. If you're inside, a good place to be is at the lowest level of your home. If you have a basement or storm cellar you can hang out in until the storm passes. 

Keep an emergency kit ready

Consider putting together a kit of things you may want to have on hand during a storm. Items you may want to include would be water, non-perishable food, flashlights, blankets extra batteries, a radio, and a first aid kit. If you have an emergency does strike your home during a thunderstorm, SERVPRO of Fayetteville is ready to help get your life back to normal. Call us, 910-860-1163

American Red Cross Tips

2/18/2020 (Permalink)

Check out www.redcross.org for more information!

TORNADOES 

Tornadoes can strike without warning and destroy a community in seconds. Before a tornado warning is issued for your area, here are some things you should do:

1. Know your community’s warning system.

2. Pick a place where family members can gather if a tornado is headed your way. It could be your basement or, if there is no basement, a center hallway, bathroom, or closet on the lowest floor. Keep this place uncluttered.

3. If you are in a high-rise building and don’t have enough time to go to the lowest floor, pick a place in a hallway in the center of the building.

4. Remove diseased and damaged limbs from trees.

5. Move or secure lawn furniture, trash cans, hanging plants or anything else that can be picked up by the wind and become a projectile.

 

THUNDERSTORM SAFETY STEPS 

Thunderstorms injure an average of 300 people every year, and cause about 80 fatalities. Here are the top thunderstorm safety steps you should follow:

1. If you can hear thunder, you are close enough to the storm to be struck by lightning. Go to safe shelter immediately.

2. As the storm approaches, take shelter in a building.

3. If you are driving, pull off the roadway and park. Stay in the car with the windows closed and turn on the emergency flashers. Avoid touching metal or other surfaces that conduct electricity in and outside of the vehicle.

4. If you are inside, unplug appliances and avoid using the telephone or any electrical appliances. Avoid taking a bath or shower, or running water for any other purpose.

5. If you are caught outside and cannot reach a safe building, avoid high ground, water, tall, isolated trees and metal objects such as fences or bleachers. Picnic shelters, dugouts and sheds are not safe.

 

FLOODING 

Heavy rains could fill rivers and streams, bringing flooding to the area. If your neighborhood is threatened with the possibility of flooding, here are some things you should do:

1. Be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice. When a flood or flash flood warning is issued for your area, head for higher ground and stay there.

2. Stay away from floodwaters.

3. If you come upon a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. If you are caught on a flooded road and waters are rising rapidly around you, get out of the car quickly and move to higher ground. Most cars can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water.

4. Keep children out of the water.

5. Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood danger.

Power Outages

2/11/2020 (Permalink)

lightening hitting power source Power outages are common!

Extended power outages may impact the whole community and the economy. A power outage is when the electrical power goes out unexpectedly. A power outage may:

  • Disrupt communications, water, and transportation.

  • Close retail businesses, grocery stores, gas stations, ATMs, banks, and other services.

  • Cause food spoilage and water contamination.

  • Prevent use of medical devices.

PROTECT YOURSELF DURING A POWER OUTAGE:

  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed.

  • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.

  • Do not use a gas stove to heat your home.

  • Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges.

  • Have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.

  • If safe, go to an alternate location for heat or cooling.

  • Check on neighbors.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A POWER OUTAGE THREATENS: 

Prepare NOW

  • Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity.
  • Talk to your medical provider about a power outage plan for medical devices powered by electricity and refrigerated medicines. Find out how long medication can be stored at higher temperatures and get specific guidance for any medications that are critical for life.
  • Plan for batteries and other alternatives to meet your needs when the power goes out.
  • Sign up for local alerts and warning systems. Monitor weather reports.
  • Install carbon monoxide detectors with battery backup in central locations on every level of your home.
  • Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.
  • Review the supplies that are available in case of a power outage. Have flashlights with extra batteries for every household member. Have enough nonperishable food and water.
  • Use a thermometer in the refrigerator and freezer so that you can know the temperature when the power is restored. Throw out food if the temperature is 40 degrees or higher.
  • Keep mobile phones and other electric equipment charged and gas tanks full.

https://www.ready.gov/power-outages

Knowing How to Prepare For Damaging Storms in Fayetteville

9/9/2019 (Permalink)


You can’t stop a tropical storm or hurricane, but you can take steps now to protect you and your family.

One important way to prepare is take the time to make a plan. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most Americans do not have supplies set aside or plans in place to protect themselves or their family’s health and safety in the event of a natural disaster, a power outage, or a flu pandemic.


The (CDC) recommends that you prepare now for a storm emergency.


 A large-scale emergency like a hurricane or a lengthy power outage can limit your access to supplies and services for several days, weeks, or even months.

Still, many North Carolina residents do not have an emergency kit for their home.
Be prepared with food and safe water, basic supplies, and the personal items you need to protect your health in an emergency.


Have you planned for your personal needs?


PERSONAL NEEDS
Gather enough food, water, and medical supplies to last at least 72 hours.


What about medication?


PRESCRIPTIONS
Prepare your prescription medications for an emergency.


Another important step in preparing is to know where to turn if you have damage from a storm in Fayetteville.


You will want to bring in professionals that can respond quickly. The team at SERVPRO of Fayetteville are trained to restore your home after storm damage. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. SERVPRO of Fayetteville is an IICRC firm. The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) creates the standards for the restoration industry and provides training and certification to restoration companies. IICRC Certified Firms have the right to display the IICRC Certified Logo.


If you experience storm damage or have questions about water damage, mold or other storm issues give SERVPRO of Fayetteville a call (910) 860-1163.


In many cleaning and restoration situations, immediate action is needed. With over 1,700 U.S. and Canadian Franchise locations, SERVPRO is strategically positioned to be faster to any size emergency. An immediate response helps to minimize the damage and the cleaning and restoration costs.

How to Prepare for the Threat of Severe Spring Weather | SERVPRO® of Fayetteville

4/19/2019 (Permalink)

Tornado and Lightening Storm

Spring is here! The arrival of spring brings longer days and more sunshine, but spring also brings with it warmer weather which is sometimes unstable. Fluctuating temperatures that can go from cold to warm in as little as an hour. That temperature changes can result in extreme weather changes. It is important that you are prepared for whatever Mother Nature may choose to send our way.

After studying natural catastrophe losses in the U.S. for 2017, it was found that severe thunderstorms were the most common and produced some of the costliest results. Out of 50 events, there were 85 fatalities and an estimated total of $25.4 billion in overall losses. These storms can bring about flooding threats, high winds and even tornadoes given the right conditions. 

Here are some things you can do to your home to prepare for the chance of severe weather:

  1. Clear out your home’s gutters, drains and downspouts.
  2. Trim trees of precarious limbs or branches that could break off in a storm.
  3. Secure or store outdoor belongings if severe weather is in the forecast.

There is no way to completely accurately predict the weather; however, forecasters have the tools available to them to at least give us an idea of the possibility of severe weather. Advanced warnings, along with the right preparation, can greatly improve overall safety for your family. One recommendation is to download a local weather app and set it to alert you in severe weather is approaching.

Having an emergency kit on hand is always advised. These kits should include the following:

  • Battery-operated flashlight and NOAA weather radio, with extra batteries for both
  • Emergency evacuation or shelter plans
  • Important personal info, like telephone numbers of neighbors, family and friends, insurance and property info, numbers for the utility companies, and medical info
  • A first-aid kit with things like non-latex gloves, adhesive bandages, tweezers, sterile gauze pads, aspirin packets, adhesive cloth tape and scissors
  • 3–5 day supply of bottled water and nonperishable food
  • Personal hygiene items
  • Blankets or sleeping bag

If your home or business is damaged in a storm, you can depend on SERVPRO of Fayetteville to get the cleanup and restoration process started fast. Call us at 910-860-1163.

How to Prevent Winter Storm Damage

3/1/2019 (Permalink)

Colder seasons bring freezing temperatures, snow, sleet, and ice, especially to homes and commercial properties in areas prone to severe winters. SERVPRO of Fayetteville can provide immediate service in repairing and restoring your residence following storm damage.

Here are ways to prevent winter storm damage:

  • Keep your pipes from freezing by wrapping your pipes in insulation. You can also keep your pipes warm by opening cabinet doors to expose them to the heat flowing in the rest of the house and keep your water flowing by turning your faucets on to a slow, steady drip.
  • You can secure the outside of your house by turning off the water hose, clearing your gutters of water buildup, caulking cracks in doors and windows, and trimming trees that can potentially cause damage to your home during windy conditions.
  • Check the roof of your house for problems before a storm strikes. Large, flat roofs are susceptible to ice build-up and snow drifts. Roofs with weak insulation or structural weaknesses can lead to leaks and extensive water damage.

SERVPRO’s quick 24-hour service ensures fast response to any size disaster. With reliable equipment, trained professionals, and a national network of franchises, SERVPRO of Fayetteville is the best choice when it comes to storm damage restoration.

For service help to Fayetteville, Hope Mills, and surrounding areas contact SERVPRO of Fayetteville at (910) 860-1163.

How to prevent winter storm damage

Colder seasons bring freezing temperatures, snow, sleet, and ice, especially to homes and commercial properties in areas prone to severe winters. SERVPRO of Fayetteville can provide immediate service in repairing and restoring your residence following storm damage.

Here are ways to prevent winter storm damage:

  • Keep your pipes from freezing by wrapping your pipes in insulation. You can also keep your pipes warm by opening cabinet doors to expose them to the heat flowing in the rest of the house and keep your water flowing by turning your faucets on to a slow, steady drip.
  • You can secure the outside of your house by turning off the water hose, clearing your gutters of water buildup, caulking cracks in doors and windows, and trimming trees that can potentially cause damage to your home during windy conditions.
  • Check the roof of your house for problems before a storm strikes. Large, flat roofs are susceptible to ice build-up and snow drifts. Roofs with weak insulation or structural weaknesses can lead to leaks and extensive water damage.

SERVPRO’s quick 24-hour service ensures fast response to any size disaster. With reliable equipment, trained professionals, and a national network of franchises, SERVPRO of Fayetteville is the best choice when it comes to storm damage restoration.

For service call SERVPRO of Fayetteville Fayetteville at (910) 860-1163.

Emergency Supply Kit

2/25/2019 (Permalink)

Emergency Readiness Kit

Are you and your employees ready when an emergency strikes?

Recommended items you should include in an emergency supply kit:

  • Water (one gallon per person per day)
  • Food (non-perishable 3-day supply)
  • Manual can opener
  • Battery operated radio, preferably a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Clothing 
  • Dust masks or bandanas
  • Plastic sheeting, garbage bags and duct tape
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities 
  • Local maps
  • Hygiene items
  • Important documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account information
  • Cash 
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container

SERVPRO® is proud to partner with the American Red Cross, ensuring communities are prepared before disasters strike, and to support our neighbors when natural or man-made disasters do strike.

For more information on how to be more prepared for any emergency situation visit: http://www.readyrating.org

SERVPRO of Fayetteville is locally owned so we are here when you need us. We are faster to any disaster and available 24 /7.